Resources

Main Page

Exposing Canada’s Chemical Valley: An Ecojustice Report

The Chemical Valley

Narnia vs Sarnia

Community Politics

Corporations and the Community

Corporate sites– these sites outline the any corporate community investments projects specifically in the Sarnia-Lambton area and the corporate community involvement and funding guidelines.

Dow’s Contributions to Quality of Life in Sarnia-Lambton. (2012) Dow Chemicals Company. Retrieved from http://www.dow.com/canada/sarnia/investment.htm

Supporting Local Communities (2012) CF Industries. Retrieved from http://www.cfindustries.com/community_supporting-local.html

Lambton GS in the Community. (2012) Ontario Power Generation. Retrieved from http://www.opg.com/community/activities/sarnia_lambton.asp

Corporate Giving. (2012) Cabot Corporation Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.cabot-corp.com/About-Cabot/Corporate-Giving

Community Investment. (2009) TransAlta. Retrieved from http://www.transalta.com/sustainability/community-investment

Welcome to NOVA Chemicals. (2011)NOVA Chemicals. Retrieved from http://www.novachem.com/SarniaLambton/

Shell Canada’s Social Investment Areas. (2012) Shell Canada. Retrieved from http://www.shell.ca/home/content/can-en/environment_society/shell_in_society/social_investment/

Community Investment. (2011) Suncor Energy. Retrieved from http://www.suncor.com/en/community/297.aspx?linkid=hCI

Sarnia. (2011) Imperial Oil. Retrieved from http://www.imperialoil.ca/Canada-English/operations_community_sarnia.aspx

Corporate Organizations– These groups are made up of corporate members as well as members of the communities they are located in and aim to preserve the local environment and safety of the communities.

CAER Sarnia Ontario. (2009) Community Awareness Emergency Response. Retrieved from http://www.caer.ca/index.html

Industries working together for a better environment. (2008) Sarnia- Lambton Environment Association. Retrieved from http://www.sarniaenvironment.com/

Bluewater Community Advisory Panel (2011) RCLG News Bulletin. Retrieved from http://www.rclg.info/bluewater_cap_bylaws.htm

Exposing Canada’s Chemical Valley. (2007) Ecojustic. Retrieved from http://www.ecojustice.ca/publications/reports/report-exposing-canadas-chemical-valley/

  • a detailed report of top polluting factors in chemical valley as well as health risks associated with them

Labor Unions

Occupational Health Page

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. (2011). Toxic substances portal. Retrieved from http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/substances/indexAZ.asp

I used this site to get more information on each of the substances released in Sarnia as well as their health effects.

Canadian center of occupational health and safety. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.ccohs.ca/

        Another resource for workers concerned about occupational health hazards.

CAREX  Canada. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.carexcanada.ca/en/about/

        I used the research on this site to learn about the levels and types or carcinogens released in Sarnia.

Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. (2011). Lung cancer: Risk factors. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/lung/basic_info/risk_factors.htm

Provided background information on lung cancer and its causes.

Daubs, K. (2011). Sarnia rallies against asbestos. TheStar.Com,

        Interviews and first-hand accounts of the reasons families of victims are rallying against asbestos exportation.

Demers, P. (2012). In Nicol A. M,…Whittaker B., Emissions mapping project CAREX Canada.

I used this tool to map the toxic substances released in Sarnia and look at the ranking of toxicity compared to the rest of Canada.

Holmes foundry sarnia, ontario. Retrieved from http://www.angelfire.com/my/HolmesFoundry/

        Both a background information site for Holmes Foundry and a site for victims and families of victims to make connections. This helped me to understand the community that has been created around the terrible health issues they are facing.

Mittelstaedt, M. (2004). Dying for a living. Mesothelioma Empowerment.

Information and first-hand accounts of the cancer rates in Canada.

National Institutes of Health. National cancer institute: Colon and rectal cancer. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/colon-and-rectal

Provided background information on rectal cancer.

National Institutes of Health. National cancer institute: Malignant mesothelioma. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/malignantmesothelioma

Provided information on the causes and symptoms of mesothelioma.

National Institutes of Health. National cancer institute: Stomach (gastric) cancer. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/stomach

Provided background information on gastrointestinal cancer.

Occupational cancer research centre. (2010). Retrieved from http://occupationalcancer.ca/

        An example of an organization working to protect worker health. I used many of their studies to learn about occupational exposure.

Occupational health clinics for Ontario workers Inc. (2003). Retrieved from http://www.ohcow.on.ca/about_us/org_chart.html

        Provided information on the systems in place to support Sarnia workers.

Parent, M., Jack Siemiatycki, & Lin Fritschi. (1998). Occupational exposure and gastric cancer. Epidemiology, 9, 48-55.

I used this source to learn about the substances that can cause gastrointestinal cancer.

PubMed Health. (2011). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001153/

Provided background information on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

State Compensation Insurance Fund. (2010). Wood dust exposure. Retrieved from http://www.statefundca.com/safety/safetymeeting/SafetyMeetingArticle.aspx?ArticleID=125

This website provided information on the chemicals that are ingested by workers through wood dust.

The Canadian Lung Association. (2011). Asbestosis. Retrieved from http://www.lung.ca/diseases-maladies/a-z/asbestosis-asbestose/index_e.php

Provided background information on asbestosis.

Young, H. L. (2011). Meeting the victims of asbestos. Sarnia & Lambton County this Week, pp. 8-9.

This report on the actions taken by asbestos victim’s families provided information on the concerns and drive of the community members in Sarnia and Lambton.

Photo Credits

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM944_Ontarios_Oil_Refining_Industry

http://louiepalu.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/Dust-to-Dust-The-Legacy-of-Asbestos/G00001mnqF7ol.5w/I0000vXZdZORffVc

http://dark-star-tron.deviantart.com/gallery/

http://preventcancernow.ca/main/issues-actions/ban-asbestos-campaign

http://www.ohcow.on.ca/clinics/windsor/

http://occupationalcancer.ca/whats-new/

http://www.carexcanada.ca/en/profiles_and_estimates/

http://www.ccohs.ca/

Special Thanks!

We would like to thank Jim Brophy and Margaret Kieth for the special attention they paid to our research as well as commend them on the incredible work they have done in Sarnia. We would also like to thank Ron Plain for taking us on a ‘toxic tour’ of Sarnia and Aamjiwnaang and allowing us to see, hear and smell Chemical Valley. Finally we want to thank Professor Deborah Jackson of Earlham College for the guidance and support she has provided along the way and will continue to offer to students as this website develops in the years to come.

4/28/2012

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